Dumbest Defense of Mitch “Fwenchie” Daniels Yet

Writes RINOglican Apologist Avik Roy at NRO:

Conservatives who criticize Daniels for his stance on the right-to-work legislation remind me a bit of liberals who called Obama a coward for abandoning the public option in 2010. Obama said often that single-payer health care was his preferred approach, but that he simply didn’t have the votes for it in the Senate. Daniels is, unfortunately, in a similar position in Indiana.

OK, so the Fleebaggers ran away in spite of Mitch “No-Balls” Daniels already not having the votes if they were present?

Is it just us, or is that the dumbest thing we’ve heard since Lucius Aemilius Paullus and Gaius Terentius Varro yelled “never mind the flanks! Keep pushing the center back!”

Thatisall.

10 comments

  1. 1
    Lizard, G.L.O.R. growls and barks:

    This is truly the funniest thing I have seen regarding the flee-bagging senators from my state.

    http://www.wisgop.org/

  2. 2
    LC MuscleDaddy growls and barks:

    Spot on Misha – I this over @ the NRO piece – worth saying here:

    “Conservatives who criticize Daniels for his stance on the right-to-work legislation remind me a bit of liberals who called Obama a coward for abandoning the public option in 2010. Obama said often that single-payer health care was his preferred approach, but that he simply didn’t have the votes for it in the Senate. Daniels is, unfortunately, in a similar position in Indiana.”

    Um – okay – so then what you’re saying here is that the Dems fled the Legislature purely for SPITE, because Daniels didn’t have the votes to pass Right-to-Work in the first place – and that NOW Daniels is giving in on R-t-W because of that vote shortfall?

    Or is it really the case that Daniels is giving in to the threat-carried-out by the Dems to bring their State to a complete standstill if they didn’t get their way – an act which should find them jobless for violating their respective oaths-of-office?

    What SHOULD be happening right now is a concerted effort to have those ‘people’ removed from the office & duties that they are willfully & purposefully shirking. They were voted into office to represent voice of their constituencies IN session, IN the legislature – NOT to cripple the State government ‘because they can’.

    If someone bombs a building and then says “Give me what I want or I’ll bomb another building” – and you give him what he wants, you’ve shown him that bombing buildings will get him what he wants and he’ll do it everytime he wants something.

    THAT capitulation is what Daniels is committing – and, as a Wrong to be tallied, it stands FAR ahead of the Right-to-Work legislation itself.

    THAT is the point to stay focused on.

    – MD

  3. 3
    ZeektheCruel growls and barks:

    Being from Indiana, I can say that I voted for Mitch Daniels. He was the better alternative. I say that because he has done some shit that makes a true conservative wonder about him.

    He has been fairly responsible with the purse strings of the tax payers. And that is commendable. He has also had some good moments (like backing the property tax reform). But he has also had some moments where he seemed to be drinking the nanny state kool-aid (see the Healthy Indiana Plan). So, I’ve always thought of him as being a up one day and down the next.

    But this shit about not being willing to get in the fight with the Dems is bad. It is indefensible in my opinion. He has had shades of this crap before with the whole “I don’t want to fight about the cultural issues” thing. But, he needs to figure out whose side he is on and who pays for the butter on his bread. The people who voted for him are the people who voted to send a Republican majority to the state capital. They set the arena for him to slug it out with the opposition and he is waffling. Not taking the fight to the Dems washes out the CPAC speech as far as I see it.

    That doesn’t bode well for his political future as far as I’m concerned. I won’t vote for him in the primaries if he will not slug it out on the cultural issues and if he cannot see the light in financially crippling the opposition when he has the chance.

  4. 4
    TheRoyalFamily growls and barks:

    Here we have the governor’s own explanation (from here):

    [Editor’s Note: I wrote to Governor Daniels yesterday explaining that he’d riled up quite a few folks here at Ricochet and asked him if he’d like to explain his decision to oppose the right to work bill that was proposed by the Republican legislature in his state. I didn’t expect to hear back right away from a man who’d just had shoulder surgery, had to contend with Democrats walking out of his legislature, and was preparing to fly to Washington for the National Governors’ Association annual meeting, but –lo!– he wrote right back. Below, his response as e-mailed to me. –Diane Ellis, Ed.]

    Diane, I’ve explained myself in the home state press for weeks, but since you asked:

    Here in Indiana we have a very extensive 2011 agenda that these critics, if they took the time to look, would strongly applaud: another no-tax budget, an automatic refund to taxpayers past a specified level of state reserves, sweeping reform of archaic and anti-taxpayer local government, reduction of the corporate income tax, and the most far-reaching reform of education in America, including statewide vouchers for low and moderate income families. We laid all this before the public during last year’s elections.

    Into this a few of my allies chose to toss Right to Work (RTW). I suggested studying it for a year and developing the issue for next year. No one had campaigned on it; it was a big issue that hit the public cold. I was concerned that it would provide the pretext for radical action by our Democratic minority that would jeopardize the entire agenda above, with zero chance of passing RTW itself. And that is exactly what has happened.

    We’re not giving up on the agenda we ran on, but this mistake presents a significant obstacle. RTW never had a chance this year and now the task is to make sure that it doesn’t take a host of good government changes down with it.

    Don’t know if it makes y’all feel any better. I certainly don’t know how I feel about it, but he’s not my governor (no, I got Gov. Moonbeam, thanks in part to folks like my dad who didn’t think his opponent was “pure” enough).

  5. 5
    bruce growls and barks:

    he folded like a cheap umbrella.

  6. 6
    LC MuscleDaddy growls and barks:

    Response to TheRoyalFamily @:

    Again – point isn’t even about RTW or any of their other legislation.

    It’s about capitulation to those who would willingly bring their own state to a grinding halt, if they don’t get their way.

    They’re wrong for doing it – he’s wrong for letting it work.

    – MD

  7. 7
    Emperor Misha I growls and barks:

    LC MuscleDaddy says:

    It’s about capitulation to those who would willingly bring their own state to a grinding halt, if they don’t get their way.

    Tochno.

    You show a weakness, the enemy will keep hitting you there again and again.

  8. 8
    LC Xystus growls and barks:

    Is it just us, or is that the dumbest thing we’ve heard since Lucius Aemilius Paullus and Gaius Terentius Varro yelled “never mind the flanks! Keep pushing the center back!”

    The Battle of Cannae?

  9. 9
    ZeektheCruel growls and barks:

    Response to LC Xystus @:
    Yeah.

    So, going with the analogy, is there is hope that a young and unknown Scipio Africanus is watching this disaster?

  10. 10
    DarthBane growls and barks:

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    That’s right. Since 1963 only three states have enacted right to work laws.

    No state, having enacted right to work, has ever returned to the closed union shop fold.

    Realizing this, starting the mid-1960’s unions and the Democratic party have spared no effort to defeat states attempting to enact right to work laws.

    In the past 26 years, only one state – Oklahoma in 2001 – has managed to successfully convert itself from closed shop to right-to-work.

    As we are seeing in Wisconsin and Indiana, unions and the Democrats will go to any length it takes to defeat right to work legislation.

    Somber note for those of you who might be thinking the tide has turned, or think we’ve seen the limit of the depravity progressives will go to:

    Right to work legislation has gone around 1 for 29 since 1963.

    And the latest attempt in Indiana just blew up spectacularly.

    Think about that for a minute.