The Oath

OK, so I’m going to be a bit heavy here, but it all ties in to where we are as a nation and the whole discussion of “seceding”, “rebelling” and “who’s in the right here.”

First off, speaking as a foreign born American, I do believe that I have a different angle on the issue. Not because I’m “better”, but because I wasn’t born to the Pledge. I had to take it, of my own free will. It wasn’t something I was just expected to do because I’d already been born here, much like I wasn’t expected to do a thing to be a Danish Lutheran because you’re pretty much that if you’re born there, and I was expected to give something up that had been my birthright in order to become an American. In other words, it cost me something. I gave away something, I got something, and I signed up for some obligations sworn in blood that were forever.

And I got a fantastic deal. I just want to emphasize that. Because otherwise I wouldn’t have done it.

But it’s different, I believe at least, when you have to make a trade rather than just pledge to the status quo.

So what’s the Oath?

“I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God.”

The first part is really important to an immigrant and, obviously, different from what a natural born American has to swear. You’re handing something over, you’re giving something up and, more importantly, to an honorable individual at least, you’re placing yourself in a difficult situation.

Because should, Heaven forbid, your native country ever find itself in a conflict with your new home, you’re damned if you do, and damned if you don’t. You can’t simultaneously honor both oaths, you have most surely given a similar oath to the country you were born in, and Hell has a special place for oath breakers and turncloaks, for very good reasons. A man, or a woman, makes no difference, is no better than the value of his or her word.

It took me a long time to take that final step and take the oath for that very reason, and it wasn’t because I didn’t want to be an American with all of my heart, I just knew what I signed up for and an oath is an oath, no exceptions or exemptions. And still it was comparatively easy for me, seeing as how history and the current geopolitical situation makes it highly unlikely that my native country and my adopted one will ever find themselves in armed conflict. I can only imagine how hard it must be for, say, my formerly Russian and Chinese fellow citizens, to have taken that oath. And I know that they’ll stand by it. But they have a much harder burden to bear, given how the world is.

But I gave it gladly and honestly, and I am bound by it forever. Without reservation or purpose of evasion.

Lest I be a turncloak and a traitor.

Then there is the second part I want to touch upon: Against all enemies, foreign and domestic. That doesn’t just mean “that stupid c*nt Barbara Boxer in Californikate”. That means every enemy to that document that you just swore to protect with your sacred honor (including your life, if need be), including that nice neighbor of yours that you’ve had plenty of beers with who once baby-sat your kids when you and the missus wanted to go have a night out on your own.

That one we all share, at least those of us who ever wore a uniform of this country or occupied an office of this country. Which is most of us at least.

Yes, that does mean that if it comes to open conflict between the Prozis (or whatever they choose to call themselves) who want to bury the Constitution as a hateful document that is no longer appropriate for the times we currently live in without following the proper procedures for amending it, then you are honor bound to, should then refuse to yield, strike them dead. You have to, or you will be an oath breaker. You can’t make exceptions for “being a generally nice fellow” or “being dumb”, you’re bound by it.

You will have violated your word just as much as you would have if you let the daughter that you swore to protect be raped without as much as trying to seek justice against the one who raped her.

That’s why I always try to calm the waters when it comes to righteous anger against the imperial presidency. It’s not because those who rail against it are wrong, it’s exactly because they’re right. But once you cross that river, you can’t go back.

You just have to be really, really sure that you’re willing to cross it before you do, because there’s no going back once your feet are wet.

And it’s also the reason why I’m done talking about “seceding.” I’m not the one “seceding.” I’m not the “rebel”. I’m among the ones who’ve decided to uphold their oaths and telling the others to either fuck off or die. Because the flag I swore an oath to, the principles that I swore to uphold with my life, no matter where the threat against them might come from, belong to me and my blood brothers and sisters, not them.

They don’t own Old Glory. They don’t own the appellation “American”.

We do.

And all we have to say to them if they want it is: “Come and get it.”

Thatisall.

8 comments

  1. 1
    LC Xystus growls and barks:

    And all we have to say to them if they want it is: “Come and get it.”

    They think, of course, that they already have it.

  2. 2
    LC Mike in Chi growls and barks:

    Misha The Magnanimous says:

    A man, or a woman, makes no difference, is no better than the value of his or her word.

    I have said often enough to my children, “Your word is precious; given at your birth for you to keep, easily lost and nearly impossible to recover.”
    One may never know if I will keep my word. Only G_d and circumstance will. Therefore, I pray circumstance or F.U.D. does not interfere with my duty to my oath.
    American or American’nt; free citizen or resident, liberty or serfdom. One requires fidelity, the other submission. (You know…like a good little muslim, or a brain dead welfare whore.)
    Net censoring is becoming more and more pervasive in recent months and this might include our ability to have a casual discussion even on blogs such as this. Good people, secure your means of alternate communication. Tighten your circle of trusted honorable folks. There is a foul wind blowing hints of a maelstrom that threatens to make us all American’nts.

  3. 3
    dasbow growls and barks:

    Misha, if you don’t mind, could you fill me (and some others, I’d wager) in on your life story? It’s not often that you see a Russian Viking with a minor in Chinese who served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Sometimes I think the only people who appreciate our way of life are those who actually had to fight to get here.

  4. 4
    Emperor Misha I growls and barks:

    dasbow @ #:

    Man, that looks like a game of telephone ;)

    The Viking is true enough, as that is what I was born. I’m not Russian, but I do, or did speak it, as more than two decades of no use of it at all has rendered me incapable of holding up as much as an intelligent conversation in it, which is sad. I hate losing skills, and I never thought that “if you don’t use it, you lose it” was true for languages as well. Then again, even my native tongue is getting rusty. Chinese I am not, nor do I speak it, but I was a Maoist in my youth until my brain took over. Finally, I did serve, but not in the U.S. Armed Forces, it was in the armed forces of my native country, an ally to be sure.

    I hope that clears things up a bit :)
    Emperor Misha I recently posted..The OathMy Profile

  5. 5
    LC SecondMouse growls and barks:

    If we actually are able to successfully fumigate for statists, and return our country to adult control, this would be a good conversation to have. I was born in the States from a long line going back to 1600-something in New England, and while I have always felt an obligation to the ideals of this nation, I never had to make an oath to prove it – these rights were mine by virtue of birth.

    Things worth having should require some effort to achieve – perhaps every citizen should make such a pledge, natural born or not.

  6. 6
    DJ Allyn, MPSE growls and barks:

    Misha Said: I gave away something, I got something, and I signed up for some obligations sworn in blood that were forever.

    I’ve heard you refer to the Oath of Allegiance as being a “blood oath” before, and I hate to break it to you, but while you might think that it should be, it really isn’t the case at all — and never has been.

    And here’s why it isn’t — and shouldn’t be:

    In a closed society, or at least one that is almost completely authoritarian, the only way you can leave that nation and become a citizen of another is by defecting, and there is no legal way to defect.

    While it is fairly easy to become a citizen in another country — provided you’ve gone through the various steps and requirements — it is also very possible to leave that nation as well.

    A “blood oath” is and never has been a requirement to be a US citizen nor should it ever be.

    For someone like me, a “blood oath” would be virtually impossible. I have been a US citizen AND a Canadian citizen since birth. I am also an Israeli citizen.

    In less than 90 days, I will no longer be a US citizen. Not because I “hate” the US, but because it no longer makes sense financially to remain a US citizen where I have to continue to pay 39 percent of my income towards taxes while I am living and working in Canada and paying only 16 percent to live in a “socialist” country.

    So I guess that I am kinda following your lead, Misha — I am going where things are more advantageous to ME. The only difference is, I am not pretending that there is some kind of “blood oath” or chest-thumping patriotism involved.

    You found what you consider a perfect place for you and your family — that is all that matters. I am doing the same for roughly the same reasons.
    DJ Allyn, MPSE recently posted..An Illustration on PrivilegeMy Profile

  7. 7
    LC TerribleTroy growls and barks:

    DJ Allyn, MPSE says:

    In less than 90 days, I will no longer be a US citizen. Not because I “hate” the US, but because it no longer makes sense financially to remain a US citizen where I have to continue to pay 39 percent of my income towards taxes while I am living and working in Canada and paying only 16 percent to live in a “socialist” country.

    How nice for you that you have the option to flee what you helped create with your vote all these past years.

  8. 8
    LC SecondMouse growls and barks:

    DJ Allyn, MPSE @ #6:

    This is deeply ironic. The United States has some of the highest income tax rates in the world, and yet still cannot cover the cost of all of its entitlement programs, so it continues to borrow hundreds of billions of dollars a year. The beast that eats all this money is a progressive construct of dozens of huge entitlement programs and an administrative bureaucracy that has insinuated itself into every facet of American life at tremendous expense to the taxpayers. Virtually all of this growth has been in violation of the Constitution, a document ignored by those who foolishly believed that a government large enough could right every perceived wrong and provide for every conceivable need.

    One of the things I find myself saying to Incurable progressives is “may you live long enough to experience the consequences of the policies you endorse.” I may even have said these words to you during one of our exchanges in years past. It would seem that this has indeed come to pass.