Reason #134,665 Why Unions Should be Outlawed

Behold the story of a 75-year-old teacher who has been collecting full pay for 13 years because the schools can’t fire him. He’s union, after all.

Now, I can see keeping him on suspension with pay while the charges of child molestation against him were being dealt with and I will be the first to admit that I find it a mite strange that he, after the charges were dropped, still wasn’t allowed to teach, but what I don’t see is the sense in the school being forced to keep him on the payroll.

It certainly doesn’t help that school in hiring teachers who can teach Johnny to read.

Thatisall.

11 comments

  1. 1
    sleeper bloviates:

    We don’t need to outlaw unions, just stop entering into contracts with them.

    We will also need to appropriately prosecute illegal behavior frequently utilized by unions and their members to coerce others to conform to their will.

    And since I’ve never been in a union and I’m too lazy to look it up, are there actually laws that require an employer to enter into a union contract against his will?

    And lastly, First. Heh.

  2. 2
    americanexpat bloviates:

    Let’s see if I’ve got this right: teacher is accused of molesting girl. Teacher is suspended and charged with felony. Charges later dropped on technicality (no further explanation), but teacher is not permitted back into the classroom. So, for last 13 years, teacher has been pulling down 100k per year for sitting on his ass at home. Here’s what I’m curious about: What part of the union’s contract stipulates that a teacher in his situation can’t be fired? Yeah, the union got a sweetheart deal, but I also blame the school board/administrators that agreed to it.

    Sleeper, whether you have to join a union or not depends on the state you’re working in, and the industry. The right-to-work states, where you can’t be forced to join a union, are in the south, the Great Plains, and parts of the southwest. The “union shop” states, where you can be compelled to join a union in order to continue your employment, are in the northeast, parts of the Midwest, and the Pacific states, including Alaska and Hawaii. In general, RTW states tend to be “red” states, union shop states tend to be “blue”. I’ll let you draw your own conclusions from that.

  3. 3
    americanexpat bloviates:

    Sleeper, further to your comment, the basic answer to your actual question (that I should have read more closely the first time) is yes. Workers have the right to form and join unions, that’s part of federal law. If they choose a union to represent them in collective bargaining, the company has to suck it up. Of course, in RTW states, employees cannot be forced to join a union to work or continue to work. And employees can “decertify” their union, i.e., declare in a referendum that the union no longer represents them, in any state. But that’s the option of the employees, not the company.

  4. 4
    DJ Allyn, ITW bloviates:

    Oh sure, blame the unions. Ooo, those big, bad unions…

    He was accused of a crime, charged, then for whatever reason, those charges were dismissed — without the benefit of a trial and acquittal. So the man is sitting in a legal limbo.

    I don’t know if the man is guilty or not — and that is the problem. He was accused, charged, and then they dropped the case without so much as a determination of his actual guilt. The schools certainly can’t take him back — he now has an outstanding suspicion that has never been legally cleared up one way or the other. He can’t work, because of the question of whether he has ever been brought up on charges.

    The absolute worst thing for a person to find themselves in is being charged and then having those charges dropped without a trial. At least with a trial, if acquitted, he’d have a legal determination of his innocence. We have none of that here. He IS being considered “guilty” because of the cloud that hangs over his head.

    That said, I have a strong suspicion this guy is guilty, and instead of the outrage over whether this guy is still on the payroll, we should be asking why isn’t this guy in a deep dark hole somewhere?

    The way I am reading it — and I could be wrong, so please chime in to point that out — it was the DOE disciplinary hearing that was dropped due to a technicality, not the actual charges. There is no story as to why the criminal charges were dismissed — and that is the part of the story that I would like to know about. I don’t care so much about the DOE disciplinary hearing.

    As far as being on suspension? The man could easily retire with his full salary AND collect Social Security which would bring his income to $125k instead of the $97k he receives now. I don’t understand why he hasn’t done that yet.

  5. 5
  6. 6
    LC TerribleTroy bloviates:

    DJ Allyn, ITW said the following:

    The absolute worst thing for a person to find themselves in is being charged and then having those charges dropped without a trial

    Really? The Worst? He was Nolle prosequi. Which usually means the DA found the evidence to not even come close to meeting the “beyond a reasonable doubt” standard.

    Seems to me the question now becomes Why didn’t the Union (that great protector of the worker) take the lack of prosecution both criminally and by the DOE and require the DOE to place him back to work? Or is this a case of business mathematics? Lets see, Attorney costs to the Union to fight this battle and get the schlub back to work, or……let him slip through a seam while they (the Union) continue to collect Union Dues from his ass……

    DJ Allyn, ITW said the following:

    He can’t work,

    Sure he can, he just cant “teach”. But he could certainly be required to show up some place everyday and perform a administrative task needed to support the education process.

    DJ Allyn, ITW said the following:

    As far as being on suspension? The man could easily retire with his full salary AND collect Social Security which would bring his income to $125k instead of the $97k he receives now. I don’t understand why he hasn’t done that yet.

    I know why…. Its cause he’s a fine upstanding patriotic American who doesn’t want to further burden the system as he recognizes he’s got everything covered and wants to give back? Or maybe he just cant do basic math. Giving up a extra 28k a year is not normally considered a indicator of intellect.

    Ultimately, I think its appropriate to point fingers at the “union” for this situation on at least a couple of levels.

  7. 7
    Library Czar bloviates:

    americanexpat

    Alaska is a RTW state however if you choose not to join the union you still must pay union dues. In my case it was 2 1/2% of gross to the IBEW. I asked them what I was getting for my money and they said they hire a lot of lawyers. Of course they would not defend me because I was not a union member even though I was paying for them.

  8. 8
    DJ Allyn, ITW bloviates:

    LC TerribleTroy said the following:

    Which usually means the DA found the evidence to not even come close to meeting the “beyond a reasonable doubt” standard.

    I am familiar with nolle prosequi. The problem is, it puts the accused in a position of first being accused, then having the accusation fall aside without an actual declaration of that person’s innocence. The prosecution files a motion to dismissed based on nolle prosequi and the court dismisses the case without prejudice. This allows the prosecution to re-file charges at a future date if they want to — usually if more evidence comes to light.

    In other words, you have a guy who has been formally charged, and while the court has dismissed the charges without a finding of guilt, it also has dismissed the charges without a clear declaration or finding of innocence.

    Because of this particular type of case, THE worst thing short of an actual finding of guilt is an undetermined finding of innocence to these types of charges. Just the mere accusation alone is enough to bar this person from ever working in his field again, if there is no concrete determination of innocence.

    And not for just his particular field of work either. Short of that finding of innocence, we are free to assume (without ever knowing the full story of the case) that this fuckwad deserves to be slowly boiled alive in his own juices, because we have to assume the worst about him, because of the charge of child molestation.

    I could accept the actions of ten cold-blooded murderers before I could accept the actions of one child molester, and I am sure that I am not alone on this. I would let all ten of those murderers loose on the streets if it keeps that one child molester is locked up in prison for the rest of his miserable life. I think a murderer is capable of redemption, a child molester is incurable.

    This is why I say this guy is in a worse position right now. He has been accused, but while the charges against him are gone, the determination of his innocence is not there. He hasn’t been cleared.

    LC TerribleTroy said the following:

    Why didn’t the Union (that great protector of the worker) take the lack of prosecution both criminally and by the DOE and require the DOE to place him back to work?

    Because he hasn’t been cleared. That is the point here. The DOE couldn’t pursue disciplinary charges because there wasn’t any determination in the case. So the “technicality” in their case is that there isn’t anything for them to discipline him for. But they can’t let him come back to work because he does have an accusation against him without any determination of guilt or innocence.

    Would YOU put him back to work around children with an outstanding accusation of child molestation hanging over his head? I certainly wouldn’t.

    Not in any job in any school system that I know of. In fact, there aren’t many jobs out there that would hire him at all based on an accusation like that. Not with most employers doing background checks on the people they hire nowadays. Just having a minor felony on your record is enough to keep you from working at a LOT of jobs. Being arrested and charged with child molestation is pretty much a guarantee that person will not get a job in many places.

    LC TerribleTroy said the following:

    I know why…. Its cause he’s a fine upstanding patriotic American who doesn’t want to further burden the system as he recognizes he’s got everything covered and wants to give back?

    He’s 75 years old. He is NEVER going to go back to work. Just retire and fade away out of friggin’ sight.

    LC TerribleTroy said the following:

    Ultimately, I think its appropriate to point fingers at the “union” for this situation on at least a couple of levels.

    I don’t see this as a union issue.

  9. 9
    sleeper bloviates:

    Response to americanexpat @:
    Huh.

    I think I heard something about the Missouri legislature considering passing right to work legislation in the next session. I think it failed back in the ’70s.

    Forced union membership sounds a lot like being coerced into a contract. I doubt there’s enough brown party liquor in the world to make me accept an explanation of how that is constitutional.

    Which reminds me….DJ, do you have any Unknown Hinson in that jukebox thingy?

  10. 10
    LC Random Numbers bloviates:

    Library Czar said the following:

    americanexpat
    Alaska is a RTW state however if you choose not to join the union you still must pay union dues. In my case it was 2 1/2% of gross to the IBEW. I asked them what I was getting for my money and they said they hire a lot of lawyers. Of course they would not defend me because I was not a union member even though I was paying for them.

    IBEW:
    International
    Brotherhood of
    Embezzling
    Weasels

    These guys are around from time to time trying to organize the place I work at.

  11. 11
    americanexpat bloviates:

    Response to Library Czar @:

    Well, per the National Right to Work website, i.e., the people who should be tracking these things, Alaska is not a RTW state. Maybe you got some bad info. Or maybe these guys are wrong. Dunno.

    http://www.nrtw.org/rtws.htm

    Although I grew up in a UAW family, I’ve never been a union member myself, and don’t want to be. But from what I’ve seen, unions tend to gain in acceptance when a company has abusive or neglectful management. My sister went through this at a hospital (in a RTW state) where she worked as a nurse, where the management was straight out of “Dilbert”. The union (Teamsters, IIRC) eventually lost the certification election, by a wide margin, but the nurses made their point. For a while at least, management treated them like human beings instead of interchangeable parts.

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